Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Expenditure

Rokesly Junior School receives a Pupil Premium Grant for each child who is entitled to receive Free School Meals (FSM) and any pupil who has recieved FSM in the last six years (known as ‘Ever 6’) and for any Looked After Children by the authority.

We are required to publish online information about how we have used the premium.

Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy
Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy 2023/2024

Pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2023 to 2024 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending on pupil premium had within our school.

School Overview

Detail Data
School name 309
Number of pupils in school 19.4%
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

2023/2024

2024/2025

2025/2026

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended) November 2023
Date this statement was published December 2023
Date on which it will be reviewed March 2024
Statement authorised by Governing Body
Pupil premium lead Joanna Neilson
Governor lead Katy Derbyshire

Funding overview

Detail Amount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £107670
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £7003.12
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) £0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£114673

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan/

Statement of intent

At Rokesly Junior school we aim to ensure that all pupils including those that may be disadvantaged, the most able, those with special educational needs, a disability (SEND) and for children for whom English is an additional language (EAL)regardless of background are able to:

Ø  acquire knowledge through a well-planned and sequenced approach which ensures progression across the key stage, that builds on previous learning;

 

Ø  access extended opportunities. Therefore, great importance is placed on inclusion which allows every child to develop and flourish on an equal footing;

 

Ø  develop into responsible global citizens by fostering an interest in the wider world and an understanding of how they can make a positive contribution.

 

This pupil premium strategy details how the school’s pupil premium funding and the recovery premium funding will be used to address the difference in attainment and life experiences between pupils eligible for pupil premium funding in the school and those that are not.

Research on effective strategies to address specific issues has been used to inform the actions to be taken.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge

number

Detail of challenge
1 Attainment and progress in reading, writing and maths is lower for pupils eligible for pupil premium grant (PPG) funding than it is for those pupils that are not.
2 Diagnostic analysis shows that gaps in phonetic knowledge are impacting negatively on academic attainment.
3 There exists a significant overlap between pupils eligible for PPG and those with SEND, creating an amplified challenge for some.
4 PPG pupils’ attendance and punctuality is lower on average than that of non-PPG pupils. Lateness and absence have a hugely negative impact on learning and wellbeing.
5 Through observations it is evident that there is a difference in levels of confidence between most pupils eligible for PPG and some of those that are not.
6 Some of the families of pupils eligible for PPG funding are experiencing a range of domestic issues which are impacting on their child’s performance at school.
7 Some of the parent/carers of pupils eligible for PPG funding lack the confidence to support their children with learning at home and are less able to engage in wider opportunities that enrich learning and life experiences.

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome Success criteria
The attainment and progress gaps in reading, writing and maths between pupils eligible for PPG and those pupils that are not is closed. Assessments indicate that attainment and progress scores for pupils eligible for PPG funding are in line with their peers.
All pupils joining the school from the Infants that are not secure in their ability to decode are supported to be able to do so effectively. All pupils except those with specific literacy difficulties are able to use phonics and a range of strategies to decode and develop their reading skills.
Quality First Teaching is evident in all subjects areas and teachers are able to adapt their planning to meet  the needs of all pupils in their class. Teachers are using strategies that significantly improve pupil attainment e.g. visual timetables, Now and Next boards, Teacher Walkthrus etc
To further develop an understanding of  teaching pedagogy so that all teaching supports the learning needs of all pupils.

All children receive very good quality first teaching.

Pupils with SEN that are also eligible for PPG funding make accelerated progress.

To ensure that the attendance rate for

pupils eligible for PPG funding is at least 96% and they attend school on time.

The rate of attendance for pupils eligible for PPG funding is at least 96%.

Pupils eligible for PPG funding access early morning interventions by arriving at school on time.

To ensure that all pupils in the school feel valued and have a strong sense of self worth and self assurance so that they are able to confidently contribute within the school and beyond Pupil voice demonstrates that pupils are able to communicate with confidence and articulates their views and opinions clearly.
To address the gap in cultural capital through continuously developing and enriching the curriculum delivered and ensuring that pupils eligible for PPG funding have access to a range of wider learning opportunities.

Pupils eligible for PPG funding access the full curriculum (e.g.year 6 residential trip), extra-curricular activities, trips etc.

 

 

 

To support parents to address some of the external barriers that are impacting on their children’s progress. Parents are better able to support their children’s learning needs as a result of greater stability at home enabling strengthened partnerships with the school.

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £7175

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed

Training to support Quality First Teaching for all across      the school to support all groups of children but particularly those disadvantaged, SEND and More Able.

Reviewing the pedagogy of teaching. Training to develop teacher knowledge of most effective ways to ensure children remember more and make good or better progress  from starting points.

All teachers CPD aimed at diminishing the difference and challenging able learners, regardless of background

Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils identifies high quality teaching as a key aspect of successful schools. DfE, 2015.

 

‘Ensuring an effective teacher is in front of every class and that every teacher is supported to keep improving is the key ingredient of a successful school and should rightly be top priority for any pupil premium spend.’

(Sutton Trust Report, 2011)

 

EEF guide to pupil premium tiered approach – teaching is top priority including CPD

1 2 3 4

Quality teaching for all –

Lessons delivered are wellplanned and adapted to meet the needs of all learners

 

CPD for teachers – focus on developing teacher subject knowledge.

EEF guide to pupil premium tiered        approach – teaching is top priority, including CPD

EEF -strong evidence that high-quality teaching for pupils with SEND is firmly based on strategies that will already be in the repertoire of every mainstream teacher, or can be relatively easily added to it.

EEF – High-quality teaching – adjusting, adapting and assessing in the classroom – is of course  crucial for the progress of all pupils.

1 2 3 4
Teaching Assistant training to enable targeted interventions within the classroom to ensure effective challenge from starting points. Making Best Use of Teaching Assistants identifies that research on TAs delivering targeted intervention in one-to-one small group settings shows a consistent impact on attainment of approximately three to four additional months’ progress (effect size 0.2-0.3). EEF- Teaching Assistants can provide a large positive impact on learner outcomes. Trained TAs delivering   a targeted intervention has a higher impact. 1 2 3

Staff audit to consider teachers’ and support staff’s confidence and knowledge as teachers of reading. Use this information to plan professional development.

Professional development – This can be whole staff development, coaching and mentoring from experienced staff, training provided by outside agencies, use of online resources, observations and team-teaching.

Rigorous teaching of phonics is supported by trained staff.

 

Reading interventions for targeted groups of children focussing on inference and

deduction.

 

Research evidence indicates that phonics approaches has a positive impact on acquiring reading skills, particularly for disadvantaged pupils.

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

 

Reading comprehension strategies have a high impact on average (+6 months). Alongside phonics, it is a crucial component of early reading instruction.

It is crucial to support pupils to apply the comprehension strategies independently to other reading tasks, contexts and subjects.

 

 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-comprehension-strategies

 

1 2 3

 Further develop emotional literacy through a range of strategies to support the development of confidence and self worth.

 

 

 

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g., improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers):

EEF_Social_and_Emotional_Learning.pdf(educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

1 3 7

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £97414.92

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Phonic lessons for pupils in all year groups that assessments show are not secure in their knowledge of all the sounds

Phonics approaches have been consistently found to be effective in supporting younger pupils to master the basics of reading

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

2
TalkBoost

Talking and language skills to help narrow the gap for children with their speaking and understanding

Speech and language UK tracker and intervention data

1 2 3
1:1 Tutoring EEF- One to one to tuition is very effective at improving pupil outcomes. It can be an effective strategy for providing targeted support for pupils that are identified as having low prior attainment or struggling in   a particular area 1 2 3

Participate in the National Tutoring Programme

Using Third Space learning

Small group tuition is most likely to be effective if it is targeted at pupils’ specific needs.

educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/small-group-tuition

 

1 2 3

 Easter School (identified Year 6 pupils)

 

 

Online Saturday school tuition for identified children

 

Small group tuition has an impact by providing additional support that is targeted at pupil needs. The reduction in the ratio of pupils to teacher compared to a   regular classroom setting also allows for closer interaction between educators and pupils. The EEF report that this can have an impact of 4 months across a year, (EEF 2021). Within the school context, data demonstrates the effectiveness of target intervention in a specific timeframe. A structure of success has been established through evaluation and analysis termly. 1 2 3
Homework club for identified Year 3 – 6 pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium Grant. Homework clubs are identified as having impact for pupils when linked to core learning, (EEF 2021). Target support for identified pupils throughout COVID disruption substantiated EEF outcomes. A  continuation of provision will be applied across 2021 – 2022 as a result. 1 2 3 4
 Online packages to support learning e.g.  Times Tables Rockstar, Lexia, Mathletics Digital technology can add up to +4 months progress (EEF, 2019). Technology  has the potential to increase the quality and quantity of practice that pupils engage in both in and out of the classroom. 1 2 3 4

 Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: 14317

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Engaging families who are hard to reach through the employment of a school home support worker on a part time basis who will support all parents in their role as parents e,g., Organising parent gym classes, signposting etc

Children who are well supported at home thrive in school. are better prepared for learning

 

The security of the evidence around parental engagement is high. The key mechanism for parental engagement strategies is improving the quality and quantity of learning that takes place in the home learning environment (EEF 2021).

5 7
Enrichment opportunities including subsidised residential visits (Pendarren) and  after school clubs for pupils eligible for PPG funding..

The EEF considered evidence based research unpicking the ‘enriching’ of education and the intrinsic benefits to ensure all children, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds deserve a well-rounded, culturally rich education.

Trips and visits can enhance and enrich the curriculum opportunities and help to develop the cultural capital

EEF – sports participation increases educational and attainment

EEF – outdoor adventure learning shows positive benefits on academic learning and self confidence

6

Strengthen the  school’s systems and procedures for pupil attendance.

And punctuality through swift intervention by the admin team and the school home support worker.

The DFE guidance is based on work with schools that experienced better engagement that led to an increase in attendance.

 

 

 

www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-attendance/framework-for-securing-full-attendance-actions-for-schools-and-local-authorities

 

4

Mental Health First Aid training

and Wellbeing training for staff members

The studies in the Toolkit focus primarily on academic outcomes, but it is important to consider the other benefits of SEL interventions. Being able to effectively manage emotions will be beneficial to children and young people even if it does not translate to reading or maths scores.

 

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/social-and-emotional-learning

 

7

Total budgeted cost: £ 118906.92

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2022 to 2023 academic year.

Intended outcomes

The attainment and progress gaps in reading, writing and maths between pupils eligible for PPG and those pupils that are not is closed.

 Points Progress

Year group

 

Reading % Writing % Maths %
PP

Non-PP

 

PP Non-PP PP Non-PP

3

(12)

 

6.5 6.3 6.3 6.3 6.4 6.4

4

(6)

 

5.2 6.1 5.0 5.8 4.3 5.5

5

(12)

 

7.3 6.4 6.7 6.7 5.6 5.9

 

The data shows that generally pupils eligible for pupil premium funding are making accelerated progress. However, in one year group there needs to be an increased focus on accelerating the progress of the targeted group.

All pupils including those eligible for PPG funding use phonics to decode words and all pupils are attaining at age related expectation (ARE) or above in reading.

Not all pupils are yet attaining at age related expectations or above in reading the data indicates that in some year groups a significant percentage of the cohort are able to do so. However, an ongoing target for the school is to have at least 90% of pupils in each year group attaining at age expected.

Year group ARE GDS
3 80.5%

36.1%

 

4 86.3%

28.8%

 

5 77.8%

25.9%

 

6

77%

 

43%

 

Quality First Teaching is evident in all subjects including in the teaching of reading.

The curriculum in all subject areas has been reviewed and adapted to ensure that there is clear intent in each subject and the curriculum is implemented through a clear well-structured sequence of lessons that builds on knowledge year on year and enables children to make long term links in their learning.

Pupils are better equipped to regulate their emotions and achieve improved well-being.

Zones of Regulation have been introduced into the school

To ensure that the attendance rate for pupils eligible for PPG funding is at least 96% and they attend school on time.

Unfortunately, the school has been impacted by ongoing illnesses which has resulted in the attendance rate for pupils eligible for Pupil premium funding being 90.9% compared to that on non PPG children being 93.6%

To further develop an understanding of  teaching pedagogy so that all teaching supports the learning needs of all pupils

To support the development of teaching pedagogy Teacher Walkthrus have been introduced to the school and are being used in every classroom. In addition, there is a CPD focus on developing teacher subject knowledge.

To address the gap in cultural capital through continuously developing and enriching the curriculum delivered and ensuring that pupils eligible for PPG funding have access to a range of wider learning opportunities.

Pupils eligible for PPG funding access the full curriculum (e.g.year 6 residential trip), extra-curricular activities, trips etc.

To support parents to address some of the external barriers that are impacting on their children’s progress

Parents are better able to support their children’s learning needs as a result of greater stability at home enabling strengthened partnerships with the school.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme Provider
ELSA Programme Haringey Educational Psychology
 Third Space Virtual Class limited
Times tables Rockstars Maths Circle Limited
Mathletics 3P Learning
TalkBoost Speech and language UK

 

Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy 2022/2023

Pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School Overview

Detail Data
School name Rokesly Junior school
Number of pupils in school 323
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils  
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2022/2023

2023/2024

2024/2024

Date this statement was published December 2022
Date on which it will be reviewed April 2023
Statement authorised by Bola Soneye-Thomas
Pupil premium lead Bola Soneye-Thomas
Governor / Trustee lead Katy Derbyshire

Funding overview

Detail Amount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £ 81715
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £ 8192
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) £0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£89907

 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan/

Statement of intent

At Rokesly Junior school we aim to ensure that all pupils including those that may be disadvantaged, the most able, those with special educational needs, a disability (SEND) and for children for whom English is an additional language (EAL)regardless of background are able to:

Ø  acquire knowledge through a well-planned and sequenced approach which ensures progression across the key stage, that builds on previous learning;

Ø  access extended opportunities. Therefore, great importance is placed on inclusion which allows every child to develop and flourish on an equal footing;

Ø  develop into responsible global citizens by fostering an interest in the wider world and an understanding of how they can make a positive contribution.

This pupil premium strategy details how the school’s pupil premium funding and the recovery premium funding will be used to address the difference in attainment and life experiences between pupils eligible for pupil premium funding in the school and those that are not.

Research on effective strategies to address specific issues has been used to inform the actions to be taken.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number Detail of challenge
1 Attainment and progress in reading, writing and maths is lower for pupils eligible for pupil premium grant (PPG) funding than it is for those pupils that are not.
2 Diagnostic analysis shows that gaps in phonetic knowledge are impacting negatively on academic attainment.
3 There exists a significant overlap between pupils eligible for PPG and those with SEND, creating an amplified challenge for some.
4 PPG pupils’ attendance and punctuality is lower on average than that of non-PPG pupils. Lateness and absence have a hugely negative impact on learning and wellbeing.
5 Through observations it is evident that there is a difference in levels of confidence between most pupils eligible for PPG and some of those that are not.
6 Some of the families of pupils eligible for PPG funding are experiencing a range of domestic issues which are impacting on their child’s performance at school.
7 Some of the parent/carers of pupils eligible for PPG funding lack the confidence to support their children with learning at home and are less able to engage in wider opportunities that enrich learning and life experiences.

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome Success criteria
The attainment and progress gaps in reading, writing and maths between pupils eligible for PPG and those pupils that are not is closed. Assessments indicate that attainment and progress scores for pupils eligible for PPG funding are in line with their peers.
All pupils joining the school from the Infants that are not secure in their ability to decode are supported to be able to do so effectively. All pupils except those with specific literacy difficulties are able to use phonics and a range of strategies to decode and develop their reading skills.
Quality First Teaching is evident in all subjects areas and teachers are able to adapt their planning to meet  the needs of all pupils in their class. Teachers are using strategies that significantly improve pupil attainment e.g. visual timetables, Now and Next boards, Teacher Walkthrus etc
To further develop an understanding of  teaching pedagogy so that all teaching supports the learning needs of all pupils. All children receive very good quality first teaching.  Pupils with SEN that are also eligible for PPG funding make accelerated progress.
To ensure that the attendance rate for pupils eligible for PPG funding is at least 96% and they attend school on time. The rate of attendance for pupils eligible for PPG funding is at least 96%. Pupils eligible for PPG funding access early morning interventions by arriving at school on time.
To ensure that all pupils in the school feel valued and have a strong sense of self worth and self assurance so that they are able to confidently contribute within the school and beyond Pupil voice demonstrates that pupils are able to communicate with confidence and articulates their views and opinions clearly.
To address the gap in cultural capital through continuously developing and enriching the curriculum delivered and ensuring that pupils eligible for PPG funding have access to a range of wider learning opportunities. Pupils eligible for PPG funding access the full curriculum (e.g.year 6 residential trip), extra-curricular activities, trips etc.
To support parents to address some of the external barriers that are impacting on their children’s progress. Parents are better able to support their children’s learning needs as a result of greater stability at home enabling strengthened partnerships with the school.

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £64780

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed

Training to support Quality First Teaching for all across      the school to support all groups of children but particularly those disadvantaged, SEND and More Able.

Reviewing the pedagogy of teaching. Training to develop teacher knowledge of most effective ways to ensure children remember more and make good or better progress  from starting points.

All teachers CPD aimed at diminishing the difference and challenging able learners, regardless of background

Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils identifies high quality teaching as a key aspect of successful schools. DfE, 2015.

‘Ensuring an effective teacher is in front of every class and that every teacher is supported to keep improving is the key ingredient of a successful school and should rightly be top priority for any pupil premium spend.’

(Sutton Trust Report, 2011)

EEF guide to pupil premium tiered approach – teaching is top priority including CPD

1 2 3 4

Quality teaching for all –

Lessons delivered are wellplanned and adapted to meet the needs of all learners

CPD for teachers – focus on developing teacher subject knowledge.

EEF guide to pupil premium tiered        approach – teaching is top priority, including CPD

EEF -strong evidence that high-quality teaching for pupils with SEND is firmly based on strategies that will already be in the repertoire of every mainstream teacher, or can be relatively easily added to it.

EEF – High-quality teaching – adjusting, adapting and assessing in the classroom – is of course  crucial for the progress of all pupils.

1 2 3 4
Teaching Assistant training to enable targeted interventions within the classroom to ensure effective challenge from starting points. Making Best Use of Teaching Assistants identifies that research on TAs delivering targeted intervention in one-to-one small group settings shows a consistent impact on attainment of approximately three to four additional months’ progress (effect size 0.2-0.3). EEF- Teaching Assistants can provide a large positive impact on learner outcomes. Trained TAs delivering   a targeted intervention has a higher impact. 1 2 3

Staff audit to consider teachers’ and support staff’s confidence and knowledge as teachers of reading. Use this information to plan professional development.

Professional development – This can be whole staff development, coaching and mentoring from experienced staff, training provided by outside agencies, use of online resources, observations and team-teaching.

Rigorous teaching of phonics is supported by trained staff.

 

Reading interventions for targeted groups of children focussing on inference and deduction.

 

Research evidence indicates that phonics approaches has a positive impact on acquiring reading skills, particularly for disadvantaged pupils.

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

Reading comprehension strategies have a high impact on average (+6 months). Alongside phonics, it is a crucial component of early reading instruction.

It is crucial to support pupils to apply the comprehension strategies independently to other reading tasks, contexts and subjects.

 https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-comprehension-strategies

1 2 3

Further develop emotional literacy through a range of strategies to support the development of confidence and self worth.

 

 

 

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g., improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers):

EEF_Social_and_Emotional_Learning.pdf(educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

1 3 7

 

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £14072

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Phonic lessons for pupils in all year groups that assessments show are not secure in their knowledge of all the sounds

Phonics approaches have been consistently found to be effective in supporting younger pupils to master the basics of reading

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

2
1:1 Tutoring EEF- One to one to tuition is very effective at improving pupil outcomes. It can be an effective strategy for providing targeted support for pupils that are identified as having low prior attainment or struggling in   a particular area 1 2 3

Participate in the National Tutoring Programme

Using Third Space learning

Small group tuition is most likely to be effective if it is targeted at pupils’ specific needs.

educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/small-group-tuition

 

1 2 3

 Easter School (identified Year 6 pupils)

Online Saturday school tuition for identified children

Small group tuition has an impact by providing additional support that is targeted at pupil needs. The reduction in the ratio of pupils to teacher compared to a  regular classroom setting also allows for closer interaction between educators and pupils. The EEF report that this can have an impact of 4 months across a year, (EEF 2021). Within the school context, data demonstrates the effectiveness of target intervention in a specific timeframe. A structure of success has been established through evaluation and analysis termly. 1 2 3
Homework club for identified Year 3 – 6 pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium Grant. Homework clubs are identified as having impact for pupils when linked to core learning, (EEF 2021). Target support for identified pupils throughout COVID disruption substantiated EEF outcomes. A  continuation of provision will be applied across 2021 – 2022 as a result. 1 2 3 4
 Online packages to support learning e.g.  Times Tables Rockstar, Lexia, Mathletics Digital technology can add up to +4 months progress (EEF, 2019). Technology  has the potential to increase the quality and quantity of practice that pupils engage in both in and out of the classroom. 1 2 3 4

 

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: 11073

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Engaging families who are hard to reach through the employment of a school home support worker on a part time basis who will support all parents in their role as parents e,g., Organising parent gym classes, signposting etc

Children who are well supported at home thrive in school. are better prepared for learning

The security of the evidence around parental engagement is high. The key mechanism for parental engagement strategies is improving the quality and quantity of learning that takes place in the home learning environment (EEF 2021).

5 7
Enrichment opportunities including subsidised residential visits (Pendarren) and  after school clubs for pupils eligible for PPG funding..

The EEF considered evidence based research unpicking the ‘enriching’ of education and the intrinsic benefits to ensure all children, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds deserve a well-rounded, culturally rich education.

Trips and visits can enhance and enrich the curriculum opportunities and help to develop the cultural capital

EEF – sports participation increases educational and attainment

EEF – outdoor adventure learning shows positive benefits on academic learning and self confidence

6

Strengthen the  school’s systems and procedures for pupil attendance.

And punctuality through swift intervention by the admin team and the school home support worker.

The DFE guidance is based on work with schools that experienced better engagement that led to an increase in attendance.

www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-attendance/framework-for-securing-full-attendance-actions-for-schools-and-local-authorities

4
Mental Health First Aid training and Wellbeing training for staff members

The studies in the Toolkit focus primarily on academic outcomes, but it is important to consider the other benefits of SEL interventions. Being able to effectively manage emotions will be beneficial to children and young people even if it does not translate to reading or maths scores.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/social-and-emotional-learning

7

 

Total budgeted cost: £ 89925

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in the 2021 to 2022 academic year.

Intended outcomes

The attainment and progress gaps in reading, writing and maths between pupils eligible for PPG and those pupils that are not is closed.

Points Progress

Year group Reading % Writing % Maths %
PP Non-PP PP Non-PP PP Non-PP

3

(8 PP)

3.9 5.4 2.7 5.3 5.3 6.3

4

(12 PP)

3.4 5 3.6 4.3 5.4 5.4

5

(18 PP)

6.9 6.7 7.1 7 7.5 6.7

 

The data shows that there is a bigger gap lower down the school. As the children settle in to the routines and expectations of Key Stage 2 their rate gf progress increases. This is seen in both English and maths.

All pupils including those eligible for PPG funding use phonics to decode words and all pupils are attaining at age related expectation (ARE) or above in reading.

Not all pupils are yet attaining at age related expectations or above in reading the data indicates that in some year groups a significant percentage of the cohort are able to do so. However,  an ongoing target for the school is to have at least 90% of pupils in each year group attaining at age expected.

  ARE GDS
Y3 81.4% 40.7%
Y4 62.85% 14.1%
Y5 76% 30%
Y6 91.25% 49%

 

All pupils including those eligible for PPG funding use phonics to decode words and all pupils are attaining at age related expectation (ARE) or above in reading.

  ARE GDS
Yr 3 81.4 40.7

 

Quality First Teaching is evident in all subjects including in the teaching of reading.

The curriculum in all subject areas has been reviewed and adapted to ensure that there is clear intent in each subject and the curriculum is implemented through a clear well structured sequence of lessons that builds on knowledge year on year and enables children to make long term links in their learning.

Pupils are better equipped to regulate their emotions and achieve improved well-being.

Zones of Regulation have been introduced into the school

To ensure that the attendance rate for pupils eligible for PPG funding is at least 96% and they attend school on time.

Unfortunately, the school has been impacted by ongoing illnesses which has resulted in the attendance rate for pupils eligible for Pupil premium funding being % compared to that on non PPG children being %

 To further develop an understanding of  teaching pedagogy so that all teaching supports the learning needs of all pupils

To support the development of teaching pedagogy Teacher Walkthrus have been introduced to the school and are being used in every classroom. In addition, there is a CPD focus on developing teacher subject knowledge.

To address the gap in cultural capital through continuously developing and enriching the curriculum delivered and ensuring that pupils eligible for PPG funding have access to a range of wider learning opportunities.

 Pupils eligible for PPG funding access the full curriculum (e.g.year 6 residential trip), extra-curricular activities, trips etc.

To support parents to address some of the external barriers that are impacting on their children’s progress

Parents are better able to support their children’s learning needs as a result of greater stability at home enabling strengthened partnerships with the school.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme Provider
Read Write Inc Ruth Miskin Limited
ELSA Programme Haringey Educational Psychology
Lexia  
Times tables Rockstars Maths Circle Limited
Mathletics  

 

Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy 2021/2022

Pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School Overview

Detail Data
School name Rokesly Junior school
Number of pupils in school 323
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils 16%
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Date this statement was published December 2021
Date on which it will be reviewed April 2022
Statement authorised by Bola Soneye-Thomas
Pupil premium lead Bola Soneye-Thomas
Governor Kerree Ahern

Funding overview

Detail Amount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year £ 72,630
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year £ 7,830
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable) £0

Total budget for this academic year

If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year

£ 80,460

 

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan/

Statement of intent

At Rokesly Junior school we aim to ensure that all pupils including those that may be disadvantaged, the most able, those with special educational needs, a disability (SEND) and for children for whom English is an additional language (EAL)regardless of background are able to:

Ø  acquire knowledge through a well-planned and sequenced approach which ensures progression across the key stage, that builds on previous learning;

Ø  access extended opportunities. Therefore, great importance is placed on inclusion which allows every child to develop and flourish on an equal footing;

Ø  develop into responsible global citizens by fostering an interest in the wider world and an understanding of how they can make a positive contribution.

This pupil premium strategy details how the school’s pupil premium funding and the recovery premium funding will be used to address the difference in attainment and life experiences between pupils eligible for pupil premium funding in the school and those that are not.

Research on effective strategies to address specific issues has been used to inform the actions to be taken.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge number Detail of challenge
1 Attainment and progress in reading, writing and maths is lower for pupils eligible for pupil premium grant (PPG) funding than it is for those pupils that are not.
2 Diagnostic analysis shows that gaps in phonetic knowledge are impacting negatively on academic attainment.
3 There exists a significant overlap between pupils eligible for PPG and those with SEND, creating an amplified challenge for some.
4 PPG pupils’ attendance and punctuality is lower on average than that of non-PPG pupils. Lateness and absence have a hugely negative impact on learning and wellbeing.
5 Some of the families of pupils eligible for PPG funding are experiencing a range of domestic issues which are impacting on their child’s performance at school.
6 Some of the parent/carers of pupils eligible for PPG funding lack the confidence to support their children with learning at home and are less able to engage in wider opportunities that enrich learning and life experiences.
7 Impact of school closures due to COVID-19 on social and emotional well being evident in the behaviour of some pupils.

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

The attainment and progress gaps in reading, writing and maths between pupils eligible for PPG and those pupils that are not is closed. Assessments indicate that attainment and progress scores for pupils eligible for PPG funding are in line with their peers.
All pupils including those eligible for PPG funding use phonics to decode words and all pupils are attaining at age related expectation (ARE) or above in reading.

Reading scores for all pupils is at least the same as their chronological age.

Every year at least 90% of all pupils in Year 3, are able to decode words in the Key Stage One Phonic Test.

Quality First Teaching is evident in all subjects including in the teaching of reading.

Teachers are using strategies that significantly improve pupil attainment.

Reading is taught at least three times a week.

All pupils are at least ARE by the end of year in reading.

There is a year on year increase in the number of pupils attaining at greater depth. The figure will exceed the national average. This will include pupils eligible for PPG funding.

Parents are more supportive of reading at home.

Pupils are better equipped to regulate their emotions and achieve improved well-being.

100% of disadvantaged pupils make at least good progress from their starting points enabling them to attain in line with all pupils both nationally and in school.

A reduction in the number of Thinking about my Behaviour sheets show that children are better able to self regulate so that they are ready to fully engage in learning.

To ensure that the attendance rate for

pupils eligible for PPG funding is at least 96% and they attend school on time.

The rate of attendance for pupils eligible for PPG funding is at least 96%.

Pupils eligible for PPG funding access early morning interventions by arriving at school on time.

To further develop an understanding of  teaching pedagogy so that all teaching supports the learning needs of all pupils.

All children receive very good quality first teaching.

Pupils with SEN that are also eligible for PPG funding make accelerated progress.

To address the gap in cultural capital through continuously developing and enriching the curriculum delivered and ensuring that pupils eligible for PPG funding have access to a range of wider learning opportunities.

Pupils eligible for PPG funding access the full curriculum (e.g.year 6 residential trip), extra-curricular activities, trips etc.

 

 

 

To support parents to address some of the external barriers that are impacting on their children’s progress. Parents are better able to support their children’s learning needs as a result of greater stability at home enabling strengthened partnerships with the school.

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed

Training to support Quality First Teaching for all across      the  school to support all groups of children but particularly those disadvantaged, SEND and More Able.

Reviewing the pedagogy of teaching. Training to develop teacher knowledge of most effective ways to ensure children remember more and make good or better progress  from starting points.

All teachers CPD aimed at diminishing the difference and challenging able learners, regardless of background

Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils identifies high quality teaching as a key aspect of successful schools. DfE, 2015.

‘Ensuring an effective teacher is in front of every class and that every teacher is supported to keep improving is the key ingredient of a successful school and should rightly be top priority for any pupil premium spend.’

(Sutton Trust Report, 2011)

EEF guide to pupil premium tiered approach – teaching is top priority , including CPD

1 2 3 4

Quality teaching for all –

Differentiation for all learners   to ensure  that objectives taught  meet the  needs of all learners including those with SEND

CPD for teachers.

EEF guide to pupil premium tiered        approach – teaching is top priority, including CPD

EEF -strong evidence that high-quality teaching for pupils with SEND is firmly based on strategies that will already be in the repertoire of every mainstream teacher, or can be relatively easily added to it.

EEF – High-quality teaching – adjusting, adapting and assessing in the classroom – is of course crucial for the progress of all pupils.

1 2 3 4
Teaching Assistant training to enable targeted interventions within the classroom to ensure effective challenge from starting points. Making Best Use of Teaching Assistants identifies that research on TAs delivering targeted intervention in one-to-one small group settings shows a consistent impact on attainment of approximately three to four additional months’ progress (effect size 0.2-0.3). EEF- Teaching Assistants can provide a large positive impact on learner outcomes. Trained TAs delivering   a targeted intervention has a higher impact. 1 2 3

Staff audit to consider teachers’ and support staff’s confidence and knowledge as teachers of reading. Use this information to plan professional development.

Professional development – This can be whole staff development, coaching and mentoring from experienced staff, training provided by outside agencies, use of online resources, observations and team-teaching.

Rigorous teaching of phonics is supported by trained staff.

Reading interventions for targeted groups of children focussing on inference and deduction.

Research evidence indicates that phonics approaches has a positive impact on acquiring reading skills, particularly for disadvantaged pupils.

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

Reading comprehension strategies have a high impact on average (+6 months). Alongside phonics, it is a crucial component of early reading instruction.

It is crucial to support pupils to apply the comprehension strategies independently to other reading tasks, contexts and subjects.

 https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/reading-comprehension-strategies

1 2 3
Metacognition and self- regulation approaches support pupils to think about  their own leaning more explicitly

Metacognition and self-regulation

EEF-– giving the children a repertoire of strategies to choose from and skills to select which are most appropriate for the task. The impact of metacognition and self- regulation strategies is an additional 7 months progress over the course of the year

1 3 7

Further develop emotional literacy through a range of strategies.

 

 

 

There is extensive evidence associating childhood social and emotional skills with improved outcomes at school and in later life (e.g., improved academic performance, attitudes, behaviour and relationships with peers):

EEF_Social_and_Emotional_Learning.pdf(educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk)

1 3 7

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Phonic lessons for pupils in all year groups that assessments show are not secure in their knowledge of all the sounds

Phonics approaches have been consistently found to be effective in supporting younger pupils to master the basics of reading

Phonics | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF

2
1:1 Tutoring EEF- One to one to tuition is very effective at improving pupil outcomes. It can be an effective strategy for providing targeted support for pupils that are identified as having low prior attainment or struggling in   a particular area 1 2 3

Participate in the National Tutoring Programme

Using Third Space learning

Small group tuition is most likely to be effective if it is targeted at pupils’ specific needs.

educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/small-group-tuition

 

1 2 3

 Easter School (identified Year 6 pupils)

Online Saturday school tuition for identified children

 

Small group tuition has an impact by providing additional support that is targeted at pupil needs. The reduction in the ratio of pupils to teacher compared to a  regular classroom setting also allows for closer interaction between educators and pupils. The EEF report that this can have an impact of 4 months across a year, (EEF 2021). Within the school context, data demonstrates the effectiveness of target intervention in a specific timeframe. A structure of success has been established through evaluation and analysis termly. 1 2 3
Homework club for identified Year 3 – 6 pupils in receipt of Pupil Premium Grant. Homework clubs are identified as having impact for pupils when linked to core learning, (EEF 2021). Target support for identified pupils throughout COVID disruption substantiated EEF outcomes. A  continuation of provision will be applied across 2021 – 2022 as a result. 1 2 3 4
 Online packages to support learning e.g.  Times Tables Rockstar, Lexia, Mathletics Digital technology can add up to +4 months progress (EEF, 2019). Technology  has the potential to increase the quality and quantity of practice that pupils engage in both in and out of the classroom. 1 2 3 4

 

 Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Activity Evidence that supports this approach Challenge number(s) addressed
Engaging families who are hard to reach through the employment of a school home support worker on a part time basis who will support all parents in their role as parents e,g., Organising parent gym classes, signposting etc

Children who are well supported at home thrive in school. are better prepared for learning

The security of the evidence around parental engagement is high. The key mechanism for parental engagement strategies is improving the quality and quantity of learning that takes place in the home learning environment (EEF 2021).

5 7
Enrichment opportunities including subsidised residential visits (Pendarren) and  after school clubs for pupils eligible for PPG funding..

The EEF considered evidence based research unpicking the ‘enriching’ of education and the intrinsic benefits to ensure all children, including those from disadvantaged backgrounds deserve a well-rounded, culturally rich education.

Trips and visits can enhance and enrich the curriculum opportunities and help to develop the cultural capital

EEF – sports participation increases educational and attainment

EEF – outdoor adventure learning shows positive benefits on academic learning and self confidence

6

Strengthen the  school’s systems and procedures for pupil attendance.

And punctuality through swift intervention by the admin team and the school home support worker.

The DFE guidance is based on work with schools that experienced better engagement that led to an increase in attendance.

www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-attendance/framework-for-securing-full-attendance-actions-for-schools-and-local-authorities

4
Mental Health First Aid training and Wellbeing training for staff members

The studies in the Toolkit focus primarily on academic outcomes, but it is important to consider the other benefits of SEL interventions. Being able to effectively manage emotions will be beneficial to children and young people even if it does not translate to reading or maths scores.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/education-evidence/teaching-learning-toolkit/social-and-emotional-learning

 

7

 

Total budgeted cost: £

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils in 2020 to 2021 academic year.

There was a noticeable increase in the number pupils requiring pastoral support and this was addressed through the introduction of mindfulness, support from the inclusion manager and the school home support worker. Some of the gaps in learning were targeted through the use of additional adults resulting in teaching in smaller group sizes. The school home support worker played an important role in terms of pupil well-being during lockdown and ensuring families had access to a range of services.

Externally provided programmes

Please include the names of any non-DfE programmes that you purchased in the previous academic year. This will help the Department for Education identify which ones are popular in England

Programme Provider
Lexia  
Times tables Rockstars  
Mathletics  

 

Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy 2020-21

Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy 2020 2021

 

1.   Summary information
School Rokesly Junior School
Academic Year 2020/21

Total PP budget

 

 

£97680 Date of most recent PP Review Sept 2020
Total number of pupils 330 Number of pupils eligible for PP 53 Date of next review March 2021

 

2.   Attainment at the end of Year 6 2019 – YEAR 6 2020 DATA NOT SHOWN DUE TO LOCKDOWN AND COVID – 19  
  National Rokesly all pupils Disadvantaged Non- disadvantaged  
% of pupils achieving the expected standard in reading, writing and maths 65% 67% 35% 78%  

% of pupils achieving the higher standard in reading, writing and maths

 

 

 

11% 22% 4% 28%  
Reading test average scaled score attainment 104 107 100.6 109.3  
Grammar, punctuation and spelling average scaled score attainment 106 109.2 106 110.3  
Maths test averaged scaled score attainment 105 106.2 100.3 108.3  
Writing progress score 0 -0.1 -2.4 0.7  
Maths progress score 0 0.2 -2.5 1.2  
Reading progress score

 

0

 

 

 

1.1 -2.2 2.3  
   
3.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP)  
In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)  
A.     A number of disadvantaged pupils often have additional needs such as SEND (particularly specific learning difficulties)  
B.    

Parents of some of the disadvantaged pupils often do not have the resources to support or engage in their child’s learning at school

 

 
C. % of disadvantaged pupils attaining at age related expectations is lower than national on entry to the school  
External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)  
D.

Some of the disadvantaged pupils do not access wider cultural opportunities

Weaker parental partnership/engagement  with the school

 
4.    Desired outcomes Success criteria  
A.    

Raise the attainment and progress  of disadvantaged pupils

Progress 16/17 17/18 18/19
W 2.5 2.3 -2.4
R -0.8 0.5 -2.2
M -0.8 -1.7 -2.5

·         Attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and other pupils nationally reduced.

·         Children will achieve A.R.E if below, and above A.R.E if currently working at greater depth

 
B.    

Pupils who are also SEND to receive appropriate support being fully inclusive meaning that they make at least expected progress from their starting points (32% of PP cohort)

 

 

 

·         Pupils who are PP and  who are also SEND make at least expected progress from their starting points  
C.    

At least expected rates of progress across KS2 for high attaining pupils eligible for PP in maths.

R 1.8
W 5.3
M 0.6

·         Pupils eligible for PP identified as high ability make as much progress as other pupils identified as high ability across Key Stage 2 in maths, Measured using a range of assessments.

 

 
D.     Increased participation in school clubs and other enrichment activities ·         More pupils eligible for PP take part in school clubs and extra-curricular activities. More disadvantaged pupils access residential trips and participate in wider cultural activities.  
E.      Increased engagement by parents of disadvantaged pupils ·         Partnership between the school and parents of pupils eligible for PP strengthened. This will be measured through attendance at consultation evenings etc.  
5.   Planned expenditure
·         Academic year 2020-2021
    i.    Quality of teaching for all
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation
Raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils

·         Targeted group support on key learning outcomes delivered by additional adults

·         Intervention and booster groups

 

 

·         Word club for all year groups

 

·         Homework club provision available in school

 

 

 

·         School to provide a bursary for YMCA breakfast club for targeted pupils

 

 

·         Class teachers and TAs meet formally termly to evaluate progress of each pupil

 

 

 

 

 

Targeted group support has in the past proven to have positive impact on pupil outcomes

 

 

 

Smaller group settings enable teachers to have a better understanding of individual pupil needs and to pre tech a range of concepts and vocabulary which leads to improved pupil confidence and active participation in whole class lessons

Pupils attend school regularly and on time and are ready to start the day without having hunger as a distraction.

 

 

Identify and evaluate strategies and appropriate interventions for targeted pupils.

 

Education endowment fund

Pupil progress review meetings to monitor progress

Monitoring the effectiveness and quality of interventions and whether they are diminishing the difference between non-pupil premium children.

 

SLT Termly as part of pupil progress review meetings
                             

 

 

   ii.   Targeted support
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?

Pupils who are also SEND to receive appropriate support being fully inclusive meaning that they make at least expected progress from their starting points

 

 

·         TAs to receive CPD that is relevant to the current needs of the pupils

 

 

 

·         2 TAs to continue delivering emotional literacy support (ELSA)

 

 

·         Intervention and strategies to be implemented for those children who are SEND and  have an EHCP/statemented

 

SEND pupils do not often make similar progress to ‘ALL’. Training on specific needs to support staff in meeting the learning styles of the different pupils in the class.

 

Emotional Literacy Support sessions to remove barriers to enable pupils to fully engage with learning.  Endorsed by Haringey educational psychology service.

 

 

Develop knowledge and understanding of aspects of SEND in order to ensure a consistent approach towards pupils.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inclusion leader to match TA CPD provision to their needs

 

Monitoring

 

Analysis of rate of progress for the targeted pupils

SLT and SMT Termly

An increase of at least 5% in the percentage of disadvantaged pupils attaining at greater depth in maths

(9% 2019)

·         Pupils meet with class teacher to discuss their progress.

·         Focussed marking and feedback to identify next steps

·         Targeted adult intervention for identified children

EEF research on effectiveness of feedback. Low cost high impact.

 

 

Evidence of progress being made in work samples SMT Termly at pupil progress review meetings

 

 

  iii.   Other approaches
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation
Increased participation in school clubs and other enrichment activities

·         School to subsidise some of the clubs

 

·         School to subsidise cost of trips for pupils that are unable to afford  them

Increased active participation in lessons as a result of an increase in confidence

 

Improved emotional well being through having the opportunity to have a wider range of experiences

 

 

Monitoring by subject leaders and referrals by class teachers

 

 

Pupil survey

SLT Termly at pupil progress review meetings
Increased engagement by parents of disadvantaged pupils

·         Continued employment of school home support worker

·         A range of workshops for parents e.g. Parent gym

·         HT to meet with parents of disadvantaged children to discuss any barriers to learning

 

 

 

Partnership working between home and school and improved relationships between parent and child. Feedback from parents Inclusion manager Termly

 

 

 

6.   Review of expenditure
·         Academic year Previous year 2019/20
  iv.   Review of expenditure  –  Quality of teaching for all
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach Estimated impact: Lessons learned Cost
Raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils

·         Targeted group support by an adult on key learning outcomes

·         Intervention and booster groups

·         Word club for all year groups

 

·         Homework club provision available in school

 

 

·         School to provide a breakfast club for targeted pupils

 

·         School to provide a bursary for YMCA breakfast club for targeted pupils

 

·         Class teachers and TAs meet formally termly to evaluate progress of each pupil

 

·         Improvement of speech and language skills through drama

 

·         Weekly 1:1 online maths tutoring

·         Mentoring programme

Targeted group support has in the past proven to have positive impact on pupil outcomes

 

Smaller group settings enable teachers to have a better understanding of individual pupil needs and to pre tech a range of concepts and vocabulary which leads to improved pupil confidence and active participation in whole class lessons

Pupils have adult support with homework and ensures access to online learning platforms for those with limited or no access at home thus removing the barrier

 

Pupils attend school regularly and on time and are ready to start the day without having hunger as a distraction.

 

 

 

 

Identify and evaluate strategies and

appropriate interventions for targeted pupils.

 

 

Improved confidence for targeted group of children leading to increased participation in lessons

 

Tutoring targeted on individual need

 

6 week training course for targeted pupils in year 6

 

Some pupils needed additional adult support in order to access the curriculum, Particularly the ones that were lower prior attainers

 

 

 

 

Successful at ensuring teachers are better able to identify and address the learning needs of quieter pupils

 

 

 

A small number of children attended to be continued next year with more pupils being targeted

 

 

 

 

 

Effective at helping to quickly identify those children that needed additional support. Continue next year

 

Programme not completed due to lockdown, but seemed to be having an impact

 

 

Programme not completed due to lockdown, but seemed to be having an impact

Programme not completed due to lockdown, but seemed to be having an impact

 

 

£73,584

 

 

 

 

 

£200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£250

 

 

 

 

 

 

£4,800

 

 

£1,600

 

 

 

£4,370

 

£420

           

 

 

Desired outcome Chosen action / approach Estimated impact: Lessons learned Cost

Pupils who are also SEND to receive appropriate support being fully inclusive meaning that they make at least expected progress from their starting points

 

 

·         TAs to receive CPD that is relevant to the current needs of the pupils

·         2 TAs to continue delivering emotional literacy support (ELSA)

 

·         Intervention and strategies to be implemented for those children who are SEND and  have an EHCP

 

·         SENCO to deliver fortnightly training to TAs

 

SEND pupils do not often make similar progress to ‘ALL’. Training on specific needs to support staff in meeting the learning styles of the different pupils in the class.

 

Emotional Literacy Support sessions to remove barriers to enable pupils to fully engage with learning.  Endorsed by Haringey educational psychology service.

 

Develop knowledge and understanding of aspects of SEND in order to ensure a consistent approach towards pupils.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helped to equip additional adults with the tools to support individual pupil’s needs.

 

 

 

Effective at supporting individual pupils. To be continued next year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An increase of at least 5% in the percentage of disadvantaged pupils attaining at greater depth in maths

(9% 2019)

·         Pupils meet with class teacher to discuss their progress.

·         Focussed marking and feedback to identify next steps

·         Targeted adult intervention for identified children

EEF research on effectiveness of feedback. Low cost high impact.

 

 

Ongoing  

 

 

Desired outcome Chosen action / approach Estimated impact: Lessons learned Cost
Increased participation in school clubs and other enrichment activities

·         School to subsidise some of the clubs

 

·         School to fund residential trip for year 6 pupils in receipt of FSM and part fund remaining pupil premium children.

 

·         School to subsidise cost of trips for pupils that are unable to afford  them

 

·         Saturday School for targeted year 6 pupils

 

 

 

·

 

Increased active participation in lessons as a result of an increase in confidence

 

Improved emotional well being through having the opportunity to have a wider range of experiences

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extra tuition in maths, English, speaking and listening at the weekend to consolidate learning and develop communication skills in preparation for secondary school.

 

 

 

More children attend residential trips and educational visits when funding removed as a barrier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Programme not completed due to lockdown, but seemed to be having an impact

 

£150

 

 

£4,070

 

 

 

 

 

 

£800

 

 

 

 

£1.200

Increased engagement by parents of disadvantaged pupils

·         Continued employment of school home support worker

·         A range of workshops for parents e.g. Parent gym

·         HT to meet with parents of disadvantaged children to discuss any barriers to learning

 

 

 

Partnership working between home and school and improved relationships between parent and child.

 

Parents feel more welcome at the school and able to raise concerns

Parents with a range of needs and issues supported £7,128

 

Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy 2019-20

Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy 2019/20

1.   Summary information
School Rokesly Junior School
Academic Year 2019/20

Total PP budget

 

 

£97680 Date of most recent PP Review Sept 2019
Total number of pupils 347 Number of pupils eligible for PP 53 Date of next review March 2020

 

2.   Attainment at the end of Year 6 2019  
  National Rokesly all pupils Disadvantaged Non- disadvantaged  
% of pupils achieving the expected standard in reading, writing and maths 65% 67% 35% 78%  

% of pupils achieving the higher standard in reading, writing and maths

 

 

 

11% 22% 4% 28%  
Reading test average scaled score attainment 104 107 100.6 109.3  
Grammar, punctuation and spelling average scaled score attainment 106 109.2 106 110.3  
Maths test averaged scaled score attainment 105 106.2 100.3 108.3  
Writing progress score 0 -0.1 -2.4 0.7  
Maths progress score 0 0.2 -2.5 1.2  
Reading progress score

 

0

 

 

 

1.1 -2.2 2.3  
   
3.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP)  
In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)  
A.     A number of disadvantaged pupils often have additional needs such as SEND (particularly specific learning difficulties)  
B.    

Parents of some of the disadvantaged pupils often do not have the resources to support or engage in their child’s learning at school

 

 
C. % of disadvantaged pupils attaining at age related expectations is lower than national on entry to the school  
External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)  
D.

Some of the disadvantaged pupils do not access wider cultural opportunities

Weaker parental partnership/engagement with the school

 
4.    Desired outcomes Success criteria  
A.    

Raise the attainment and progress of disadvantaged pupils

Progress 16/17 17/18 18/19
W 2.5 2.3 -2.4
R -0.8 0.5 -2.2
M -0.8 -1.7 -2.5

·         Attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and other pupils nationally reduced.

·         Children will achieve A.R.E if below, and above A.R.E if currently working at greater depth

 
B.    

Pupils who are also SEND to receive appropriate support being fully inclusive meaning that they make at least expected progress from their starting points (32% of PP cohort)

 

 

 

·         Pupils who are PP and who are also SEND make at least expected progress from their starting points  
C.    

At least expected rates of progress across KS2 for high attaining pupils eligible for PP in maths.

R 1.8
W 5.3
M 0.6

·         Pupils eligible for PP identified as high ability make as much progress as other pupils identified as high ability across Key Stage 2 in maths, Measured using a range of assessments.

 

 
D.     Increased participation in school clubs and other enrichment activities ·         More pupils eligible for PP take part in school clubs and extra-curricular activities. More disadvantaged pupils access residential trips and participate in wider cultural activities.  
E.      Increased engagement by parents of disadvantaged pupils ·         Partnership between the school and parents of pupils eligible for PP strengthened. This will be measured through attendance at consultation evenings etc.  
5.   Planned expenditure
·         Academic year 2019-2020
    i.    Quality of teaching for all
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation
Raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils

·         Targeted group support on key learning outcomes

·         Intervention and booster groups

 

·         Easter school for year 6 pupils Summer school for year 5 pupils

 

 

 

·         Word club for all year groups

·         Homework club provision available in school

 

 

 

·         School to provide a bursary for YMCA breakfast club for targeted pupils

 

 

·         Class teachers and TAs meet formally termly to evaluate progress of each pupil

 

·         Improvement of speech and language skills through drama

Targeted group support has in the past proven to have positive impact on pupil outcomes

 

Decrease the dip that follows a holiday and to ensure education remains a focus for the pupils even during times of school closure.

 

Class teachers are in the best position to know what the next steps are for each child on a week-to-week basis. Prior assessment ensures that appropriate targets are set.

 

Pupils attend school regularly and on time and are ready to start the day without having hunger as a distraction.

 

 

Identify and evaluate strategies and appropriate interventions for targeted pupils.

 

Education endowment fund

Pupil progress review meetings to monitor progress

Monitoring the effectiveness and quality of interventions and whether they are diminishing the difference between non-pupil premium children.

 

SLT Termly as part of pupil progress review meetings
                             

 

 

   ii.   Targeted support
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?

Pupils who are also SEND to receive appropriate support being fully inclusive meaning that they make at least expected progress from their starting points

 

 

·         TAs to receive CPD that is relevant to the current needs of the pupils

 

 

 

·         2 TAs to continue delivering emotional literacy support (ELSA)

 

 

·         Intervention and strategies to be implemented for those children who are SEND and have an EHCP/statemented

 

SEND pupils do not often make similar progress to ‘ALL’. Training on specific needs to support staff in meeting the learning styles of the different pupils in the class.

 

Emotional Literacy Support sessions to remove barriers to enable pupils to fully engage with learning. Endorsed by Haringey educational psychology service.

 

 

Develop knowledge and understanding of aspects of SEND in order to ensure a consistent approach towards pupils.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inclusion leader to match TA CPD provision to their needs

 

Monitoring

 

Analysis of rate of progress for the targeted pupils

SLT and SMT Termly

An increase of at least 5% in the percentage of disadvantaged pupils attaining at greater depth in maths

(9% 2019)

·         Pupils meet with class teacher to discuss their progress.

·         Focussed marking and feedback to identify next steps

·         Targeted adult intervention for identified children

EEF research on effectiveness of feedback. Low cost high impact.

 

 

Evidence of progress being made in work samples SMT Termly at pupil progress review meetings

 

 

  iii.   Other approaches
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation
Increased participation in school clubs and other enrichment activities

·         School to subsidise some of the clubs

 

·         School to fund residential trip for year 6 pupils in receipt of FSM and part fund remaining pupil premium children.

 

·         School to subsidise cost of trips for pupils that are unable to afford them

Increased active participation in lessons as a result of an increase in confidence

 

Improved emotional well being through having the opportunity to have a wider range of experiences

 

 

Monitoring by subject leaders and referrals by class teachers

 

 

Pupil survey

SLT Termly at pupil progress review meetings
Increased engagement by parents of disadvantaged pupils

·         Continued employment of school home support worker

·         A range of workshops for parents e.g. Parent gym

·         HT to meet with parents of disadvantaged children to discuss any barriers to learning

 

 

 

Partnership working between home and school and improved relationships between parent and child. Feedback from parents Inclusion manager Termly

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.   Review of expenditure
·         Academic year Previous year 2018-2019
  iv.   Review of expenditure – Quality of teaching for all
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach Estimated impact: Lessons learned Cost
Raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils

·         Targeted group support on key learning outcomes

 

·         Intervention and booster groups

 

·         Easter school for year 6 pupils Summer school for year 5 pupils

 

·         Word club for all year groups

·         Homework club provision available in school

 

·         School to provide a breakfast club for targeted pupils

 

·         Class teachers and TAs meet formally termly to evaluate progress of each pupil

 

·         Participation in NLC project focusing on engagement with reading.

Targeted group support has in the past proven to have positive impact on pupil outcomes

 

 

 

 

 

Decrease the dip that follows a holiday and to ensure education remains a focus for the pupils even during times of school closure.

 

Class teachers are in the best position to know what the next steps are for each child on a week-to-week basis. Prior assessment ensures that appropriate targets are set.

 

Pupils attend school regularly and on time and are ready to start the day without having hunger as a distraction.

 

 

Identify and evaluate strategies and appropriate interventions for targeted pupils.

 

Survey of pupil premium children identified reading as key area of need.

 

Some pupils needed additional adult support in order to access the curriculum, Particularly the ones that were lower prior attainers

 

 

 

 

This was particularly effective during the Easter break and following the summer holiday

 

 

Successful at ensuring teachers aware of quieter pupils

 

 

 

A small number of children attended to be continued next year with more pupils being targeted

 

 

Effective at helping to quickly identify those children that needed additional support. Continue next year

 

Page Turners project successful

£24528

 

 

 

 

 

 

£6874

 

 

 

£2480

 

 

 

 

£105

 

 

 

 

£14400

           

 

 

Desired outcome Chosen action / approach Estimated impact: Lessons learned Cost

Pupils who are also SEND to receive appropriate support being fully inclusive meaning that they make at least expected progress from their starting points

 

 

·         TAs to receive CPD that is relevant to the current needs of the pupils

·         2 TAs trained as emotional literacy support assistants. Run ELSA programme 2018 / 19.

 

·         Intervention and strategies to be implemented for those children who are SEND and have an EHCP/statemented

 

·         SENCO to deliver fortnightly training to TAs

 

SEND pupils do not often make similar progress to ‘ALL’. Training on specific needs to support staff in meeting the learning styles of the different pupils in the class.

 

Emotional Literacy Support sessions to remove barriers to enable pupils to fully engage with learning. Endorsed by Haringey educational psychology service.

 

Develop knowledge and understanding of aspects of SEND in order to ensure a consistent approach towards pupils.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helped to equip additional adults with the tools to support individual pupil’s needs.

 

 

 

Effective at supporting individual pupils. To be continued next year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£49056

Higher rates of progress across KS2 for high attaining pupils eligible for PP

·         Pupils meet with class teacher to discuss their progress.

·         Focussed marking and feedback to identify next steps

·         Talk 4 Writing programme developed to include increased focus on developing writing skills of higher attaining pupils

·         Close tracking and monitoring of progress using Target Tracker

EEF research on effectiveness of feedback. Low cost high impact.

 

Talk 4 Writing evaluation end of summer 2018 identified need to develop programme further for higher attaining pupils.

Ongoing for the entire year  

 

 

Desired outcome Chosen action / approach Estimated impact: Lessons learned Cost
Increased participation in school clubs and other enrichment activities

·         School to subsidise some of the clubs

 

·         School to fund residential trip for year 6 pupils in receipt of FSM and part fund remaining pupil premium children.

 

·         School to subsidise cost of trips for pupils that are unable to afford them

Increased active participation in lessons as a result of an increase in confidence

 

Improved emotional well being through having the opportunity to have a wider range of experiences

 

 

 

 

 

More children attend residential trips and educational visits when funding removed as a barrier

£4870
Increased engagement by parents of disadvantaged pupils

·         Continued employment of school home support worker

 

·         A range of workshops for parents e.g. benefits workshop, parenting support.

Partnership working between home and school and improved relationships between parent and child. Parents with a range of needs and issues supported £7350

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rokesly Junior Pupil Premium Strategy 2018-2019
  1. Summary information
School Rokesly Junior School
Academic Year 2018/19

Total PP budget

 

 

£110008 Date of most recent PP Review Sept 2018
Total number of pupils 353 Number of pupils eligible for PP 71 Date for next internal review of this strategy April 2019

 

  1. Attainment at the end of Year 6 2018
 
  National Rokesly all pupils Disadvantaged Non- disadvantaged  
% of pupils achieving the expected standard in reading, writing and maths 64% 66% 41% 72%  
% of pupils achieving the higher standard in reading, writing and maths 10% 16% 9% 18%  
Reading test average scaled score attainment 105 107 101

 

109

 
Grammar, punctuation and spelling average scaled score attainment 106 110 108 111  
Maths test averaged scaled score attainment 104 105 101 106  
Writing progress score
0
 0.5
 2.3
-0.1
 
Maths progress score
0
 0.4
-1.7
 1.1
 
Reading progress score
0
2.2
 0.5
 2.7
 
   
  1. Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP)
 
In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)  
  1.  
A number of disadvantaged pupils often have additional needs such as SEND (particularly specific learning difficulties)  
  1.  

Parents of some of the disadvantaged pupils often do not have the resources to support or engage in their child’s learning at school

 

 
  % of disadvantaged pupils attaining at age related expectations is lower than national on entry to the school  
External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)  
 

Some of the disadvantaged pupils do not access wider cultural opportunities

Weaker parental partnership/engagement  with the school

 
  1. Desired outcomes
Success criteria  
  1.  

Raise the attainment and progress  of disadvantaged pupils

Progress 15/16 16/17 17/18
W -1.8  2.5  2.3
R -1.9 -0.8  0.5
M -3.3 -0.8 -1.7
  • Attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and other pupils nationally reduced.
  • Children will achieve A.R.E if below, and above A.R.E if currently working at greater depth
 
  1.  

Pupils who are also SEND to receive appropriate support being fully inclusive meaning that they make at least expected progress from their starting points

 

 

 

  • Pupils who are PP and  who are also SEND make at least expected progress from their starting points
 
  1.  
At least expected rates of progress across KS2 for high attaining pupils eligible for PP
  • Pupils eligible for PP identified as high ability make as much progress as other pupils  identified as high ability across Key Stage 2 in maths, reading and writing. Measured using a range of assessments.

 

 
  1.  
Increased participation in school clubs and other enrichment activities
  • More pupils eligible for PP take part in school clubs and extra-curricular activities. More disadvantaged pupils access residential trips and participate in wider cultural activities.
 
  1.  
Increased engagement by parents of disadvantaged pupils
  • Partnership between the school and parents of pupils eligible for PP strengthened. This will be measured through attendance at consultation evenings etc.
 
  1. Planned expenditure
  • Academic year
2018-2019
    i.   Quality of teaching for all
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation
Raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils
  • Targeted group support on key learning outcomes
  • Intervention and booster groups
  • Easter school for year 6 pupils Summer school for year 5 pupils
  • Word club for all year groups
  • Homework club provision available in school
  • School to provide a breakfast club for targeted pupils
  • Class teachers and TAs meet formally termly to evaluate progress of each pupil
  • Participation in NLC project focusing on engagement with reading.

Targeted group support has in the past proven to have positive impact on pupil outcomes

 

Decrease the dip that follows a holiday and to ensure education remains a focus for the pupils even during times of school closure.

 

Class teachers are in the best position to know what the next steps are for each child on a week-to-week basis. Prior assessment ensures that appropriate targets are set.

 

Pupils attend school regularly and on time and are ready to start the day without having hunger as a distraction.

 

 

Identify and evaluate strategies and appropriate interventions for targeted pupils.

 

Survey of pupil premium children identified reading as key area of need.

 

Pupil progress review meetings to monitor progress

Monitoring the effectiveness and quality of interventions and whether they are diminishing the difference between non-pupil premium children.

 

SLT Termly as part of pupil progress review meetings

 

ii.   Targeted support
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation?

Pupils who are also SEND to receive appropriate support being fully inclusive meaning that they make at least expected progress from their starting points

 

 

  • TAs to receive CPD that is relevant to the current needs of the pupils
  • 2 TAs trained as emotional literacy support assistants. Run ELSA programme 2018 / 19.
  • Intervention and strategies to be implemented for those children who are SEND and  have an EHCP/statemented
  • SENCO to deliver fortnightly training to TAs

SEND pupils do not often make similar progress to ‘ALL’. Training on specific needs to support staff in meeting the learning styles of the different pupils in the class.

 

Emotional Literacy Support sessions to remove barriers to enable pupils to fully engage with learning.  Endorsed by Haringey educational psychology service.

 

Develop knowledge and understanding of aspects of SEND in order to ensure a consistent approach towards pupils.

 

 

 

Inclusion leader to match TA CPD provision to their needs

 

Monitoring

 

Analysis of rate of progress for the targeted pupils

SLT and SMT Termly
Higher rates of progress across KS2 for high attaining pupils eligible for PP
  • Pupils meet with class teacher to discuss their progress.
  • Focussed marking and feedback to identify next steps
  • Talk 4 Writing programme developed to include increased focus on developing writing skills of higher attaining pupils
  • Close tracking and monitoring of progress using Target Tracker

EEF research on effectiveness of feedback. Low cost high impact.

 

Talk 4 Writing evaluation end of summer 2018 identified need to develop programme further for higher attaining pupils.

Evidence of progress being made in work samples SMT Termly at pupil progress review meetings

 

iii.   Other approaches
Desired outcome Chosen action / approach What is the evidence and rationale for this choice? How will you ensure it is implemented well? Staff lead When will you review implementation
Increased participation in school clubs and other enrichment activities
  • School to subsidise some of the clubs
  • School to fund residential trip for year 6 pupils in receipt of FSM and part fund remaining pupil premium children.
  • School to subsidise cost of trips for pupils that are unable to afford  them

Increased active participation in lessons as a result of an increase in confidence

 

Improved emotional well being through having the opportunity to have a wider range of experiences

 

 

Monitoring by subject leaders and referrals by class teachers

 

 

Pupil survey

SLT Termly at pupil progress review meetings
Increased engagement by parents of disadvantaged pupils
  • Continued employment of school home support worker
  • A range of workshops for parents e.g. benefits workshop, parenting support.
Partnership working between home and school and improved relationships between parent and child. Feedback from parents Inclusion manager Termly

 

Contact Us

Rokesly Junior School
Rokesly Avenue,
London, N8 8NH

Phone: 020 8348 0290
Email: admin@rokesly-jun.haringey.sch.uk

Headteacher: Bola Soneye-Thomas